In summary

Can a daily dose of CBD help with depression? 

  • Because of its antidepressant and anxiolytic (anxiety-reducing) properties, CBD might help improve various conditions related to mental health(1), including major depressive disorder. 
  • The 2018 study published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology concluded that CBD may also treat other psychiatric conditions. These include various anxiety disorders, epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, and sleep disorders(2).
  • Studies reveal that CBD helps manage depression because it activates 5-HT1A receptors(3) and facilitates the formation of new neurons in the hippocampus(4).
  • However, further study is needed to conclude that CBD alone can treat these psychiatric disorders, especially more severe conditions like extreme depression.
  • Compared to antidepressants, CBD has minimal side effects and no adverse reactions. Patients who want to include CBD oils in their medication regimen should consult with their doctor first.
The full article

Best CBD Oil for Depression

Editor's Pick

Spruce 750mg Lab Grade CBD Oil

Specifically formulated to be more palatable to CBD users
Spruce 750mg Lab Grade CBD Oil Bottle
  • Overall Clinical Score
    99%
    Editor's Pick
  • Clinical Scores
    Value
    Quality
    Strength
    Customer Service
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Effectiveness
    Perfect for...New CBD users
  • Summary

    Each bottle of the 750mg CBD oil tincture contains 25mg of CBD per dropper full. The oil is peppermint flavor to mask any unpleasant tastes related to CBD.

    Pro's
    Cons's
     Mid-strength  No other flavors
     Natural peppermint flavor
     Made from 100% organic and natural ingredients
  • Features
    Discount pricing available? 20% Off Coupon Code: CBDCLINICALS
    Source
    Source of Hemp
    Kentucky, USA & North Carolina, USA
    Form Oil Tincture
    Ingredients Organic Hemp Seed Oil, Full Spectrum CBD Oil
    Type
    Type of CBD
    Full Spectrum
    Extraction
    Extraction Method
    Moonshine extraction method
    How to take it Under tongue
    Potency
    Potency - CBD Per Bottle
    750 mg per bottle
    Carrier Oil Organic Hemp Seed Oil
    Concentration
    CBD Concentration Per Serving
    25mg of CBD per dropper full (1ml)
    Drug Test Contains 0.3% THC but there is a chance you may test positive for marijuana
    Flavours Peppermint
    Price Range $89 ($75.65 for subscriptions, 15% discount from regular price)
    $/mg CBD
    Price ($/mg)
    $0.12/mg ($0.10/mg with subscription)
    Shipping
    Shipping/Time to delivery
    2-4 business days (first class USPS)
    Lab Tests
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Third Party Lab Tested post formulation for safety and potency, available on website
    Contaminants Organic, Non-GMO, no pesticides, no herbicides, no solvents or chemical fertilizers, No preservatives or sweeteners
    Allergens Vegan, Gluten free
    Refund policy Within 30 days
    Recommended for New CBD users
    Countries served USA only (all 50 states)
Check Latest Prices
Best Organic

NuLeaf Naturals 900mg Full Spectrum Hemp CBD Oil

Perfect for anyone who are looking for CBD products that promote a healthy body and mind.
NuLeaf Naturals 900mg Full Spectrum Hemp CBD Oil
  • Overall Clinical Score
    99%
    Best Organic
  • Clinical Scores
    Value
    Quality
    Strength
    Customer Service
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Effectiveness
    Perfect for...Health-conscious persons
  • Summary

    Natural remedy for various illnesses. NuLeaf Naturals’ CBD oil is a whole-plant extract containing a full spectrum of naturally occurring synergistic cannabinoids and terpenes.

    Pro's
    Cons's
     Pure CBD hemp  No other flavors
     All natural
     Approximately 300 drops total
  • Features
    Discount pricing available? 20% Off Coupon Code: CBDCLINICALS20
    Source
    Source of Hemp
    Colorado, USA
    Form Oil Tincture
    Ingredients Full Spectrum Hemp Extract, Organic Virgin Hemp Seed Oil
    Type
    Type of CBD
    Full Spectrum CBD
    Extraction
    Extraction Method
    CO2 Method
    How to take it Under the tongue for approximately 30 seconds before swallowing
    Potency
    Potency - CBD Per Bottle
    900mg per bottle
    Carrier Oil Organic Hemp Oil
    Concentration
    CBD Concentration Per Serving
    60mg per dropper full (1ml)
    Drug Test Contains 0.3% THC but there is a chance you may test positive for marijuana
    Flavours Natural
    Price Range $99 - $434
    $/mg CBD
    Price ($/mg)
    $0.08 - $0.13
    Shipping
    Shipping/Time to delivery
    2-3 Days via USPS
    Lab Tests
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Third Party Lab Tested post formulation for safety and potency, available on website
    Contaminants No additives or preservatives, Non-GMO, NO herbicides, pesticides, or chemical fertilizers
    Allergens Not specified
    Refund policy Within 30 days
    Recommended for Health-conscious persons
    Countries served USA (all 50 states) and over 40 countries including Australia, Azerbaijan, Beliza, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Brazil, Chile, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Hong Kong, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Macao, Malaysia, Malta, Netherlands, New Zealand, Oman, Paraguay, Poland, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, and many more.
Check Latest Prices
Best Customer Service

Sabaidee Super Good Vibes CBD Oil

4x the strength of a regular cbd oil
Sabaidee Super Good Vibes CBD Oil
  • Overall Clinical Score
    99%
    Best Customer Service
  • Clinical Scores
    Value
    Quality
    Strength
    Customer Service
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Effectiveness
    Perfect for...Patients who are looking for serious CBD oil support
  • Summary

    Super Good Vibes CBD Oil provides the purest and highest quality Cannabidiol (CBD) on the market as well as other high quality phytocannabinoids, terpenes, vitamins, omega fatty acids, trace minerals, and other beneficial for your health elements, which all work together to provide benefits.

    Pro's
    Cons's
     Extra strong  No other flavors
     Significant benefits with just a few drops
     100% Natural ingredients
  • Features
    Discount pricing available? 15% Off Coupon Code: CBDCLINICALS15
    Source
    Source of Hemp
    Colorado, USA
    Form Oil Tincture
    Ingredients Cannabidiol (CBD), Coconut Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) Oil, Peppermint oil
    Type
    Type of CBD
    Broad Spectrum
    Extraction
    Extraction Method
    CO2-extraction
    How to take it Using 1-3 servings per day as needed is a good start to determine how much you need
    Potency
    Potency - CBD Per Bottle
    1000 mg per bottle
    Carrier Oil Coconut MCT Oil
    Concentration
    CBD Concentration Per Serving
    33.5 mg per dropper (1ml)
    Drug Test Contains 0.3% THC but there is a chance you may test positive for marijuana
    Flavours Peppermint
    Price Range Single Bottle - $119.95, 2-Pack - $109.97 each, 3-Pack - $98.31 each, 6-Pack - $79.99 each
    $/mg CBD
    Price ($/mg)
    Single bottle - $0.010, 2-Pack - $0.011, 3-Pack - $0.009, 6-Pack - $0.007
    Shipping
    Shipping/Time to delivery
    3-5 Business days
    Lab Tests
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Third Party Lab Tested post formulation for safety and potency, available on website
    Contaminants Contaminant-free
    Allergens Vegan and Gluten-free
    Refund policy Within 30 days
    Recommended for Patients who are looking for serious CBD oil support
    Countries served USA only (all 50 states)
Check Latest Prices
Natural Alternative

cbdMD CBD Oil Tinctures

Uses USA hemp that is grown on non-GMO farms, and is both vegan and gluten-free
cbdMD CBD Oil Tinctures Products
  • Overall Clinical Score
    99%
    Natural Alternative
  • Clinical Scores
    Value
    Quality
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    Customer Service
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Effectiveness
    Perfect for...CBD users with different needs
  • Summary

    cbdMD’s CBD oil tinctures are made using only CBD sourced from medical hemp and MCT oil as a carrier oil. Tinctures are offered in orange, mint, natural, and berry flavors. Safe for daily use, the oil tinctures are packaged with a built-in rubber dropper to adjust CBD dosage easily. The packaging is made to be easy to transport and discreet to use.

    Pro's
    Cons's
     Plenty of concentrations to choose from for all people with various kinds of needs  cbdMD uses MCT as its carrier oil so individuals who are allergic with coconuts should consider other brand options
     Has vegan, organic, and gluten-free ingredients
     Affordable pricing
     Affordable pricing
  • Features
    Discount pricing available? 15% Off Coupon Code: cbdMD15
    Source
    Source of Hemp
    Kentucky, USA
    Form Oil Tincture
    Ingredients Cannabidiol (CBD), MCT Oil, and Flavoring
    Type
    Type of CBD
    Broad Spectrum
    Extraction
    Extraction Method
    CO2 extraction method
    How to take it Under tongue
    Potency
    Potency - CBD Per Bottle
    300 mg - 7500 mg / 30 ml bottle, 1000 mg - 1500 mg / 60 ml bottle
    Carrier Oil Organic Coconut MCT Oil
    Concentration
    CBD Concentration Per Serving
    30 ml: 300 mg - 10 mg per dropper (1ml), 750 mg - 25 mg per dropper (1ml), 1500 mg - 50 mg per dropper (1ml), 3000 mg - 100 mg per dropper (1ml), 5000 mg - 166.6 mg per dropper (1ml), 7500 mg - 250 mg per dropper (1ml), 60 ml: 1000 mg - 16.6 mg per dropper (1ml), 1500 mg - 25 mg per dropper (1ml)
    Drug Test Containing less than 0.3% THC, there are still trace amounts
    Flavours Natural, Berry, Orange and Mint
    Price Range 30 ml Bottles: $29.99 for 300 mg, $69.99 for 750 mg, $99.99 for 1500 mg, $149.99 for 3000 mg, $239.99 for 5000 mg, $339.99 for 7500 mg 60 ml Bottles: $74.99 for 1000 mg, $99.99 for 1500 mg
    $/mg CBD
    Price ($/mg)
    30 ml - $0.05 - $0.10, 60 ml - $0.06 - $0.07
    Shipping
    Shipping/Time to delivery
    2-5 Business days (via Fedex)
    Lab Tests
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Third Party Lab Tested post formulation for safety and potency, available on website
    Contaminants 100% organic, non-GMO, and vegan-certified
    Allergens Vegan, Gluten free
    Refund policy Within 30 days
    Recommended for CBD users with different needs
    Countries served USA only (all 50 states)
Check Latest Prices

Why People are Turning to CBD for Depression 

CBD is known to help treat various ailments, including psychiatric conditions. Several studies have shown that CBD relieves the clinical signs of depression.

Anxiety is a significant symptom of depression, and several studies conclude that CBD helps alleviate anxiety.

In a 2011 study, patients with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) were subjected to a simulation public speaking test. Those who were pretreated with CBD significantly improved(5).

Their anxiety markedly reduced, along with cognitive impairment and discomfort in performing their speech. 

Another study has found that CBD may help alleviate the symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders like epilepsy and schizophrenia. Researchers have observed CBD’s calming effect in the central nervous system(6).

A study in 2015 supports this. The study has also observed CBD’s therapeutic effects on generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and even obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (7).

A study published in the journal CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets outlines the benefits of CBD. The research highlighted CBD not only as an anxiolytic treatment but also as an antidepressant that treats the symptoms of depression (8).

Another set of researchers supports CBD’s use because of its antipsychotic and anxiety-reducing properties. CBD also has neuroprotective effects. The study concludes CBD’s may be useful in treating depression, epilepsy, schizophrenia, substance abuse and dependence, social phobia, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress, Parkinson’s disease, and sleep disorders (9).

A journal outlines the case of an adolescent who has multiple substance use disorder. He also has severe depression, social phobia, and narcissistic personality disorder. In the study, the researchers administered CBD capsules in various dosages for eight weeks (10).

The 16-year old male’s treatment with antidepressants has proven unsuccessful, so he sought help from a public clinic in 2018.

The patient’s simple phobias and symptoms of depression, anxiety, paranoia, and dissociation improved. Without withdrawal symptoms, the patient also quit taking illegal drugs like cannabis, cocaine, and ecstasy.

It is the first report on CBD’s positive effects on patients with multiple substance use disorders.

A study published in the Journal of Cannabis Research was conducted to review the therapeutic benefits of CBD and CBD-containing compounds like nabiximols in treating a variety of psychiatric disorders and cannabis dependence (11).

Nabiximols is an extract from Cannabis Sativa that has been purified into a 1:1 ratio of CBD and THC. Sativex is a famous brand of nabiximols.

In the research, CBD was given to the test subjects in various ways, including oral ingestion, inhalation spray, and sublingual administration (under the tongue). The study revealed that compared to oral administration, inhalation of CBD had higher bioavailability (11-43%).

Bioavailability is the fraction of the drug that reaches the blood.

CBD and nabiximols were most effective in treating cannabis use-related disorders. They also proved promising in treating other psychiatric disorders because of their antipsychotic properties. Their anxiolytic and neuroprotective effects also contributed to the treatment.  

In schizophrenia and psychosis cases, high doses of CBD (above 1200 mg daily) showed potential therapeutic benefits, especially in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

The study also supported CBD use in treating anxiety disorders like post-traumatic stress disorders and social performance-related anxiety. Patients with autism spectrum disorder who were administered CBD also exhibited reduced hyperactivity as well as self-injurious behaviors, insomnia, and anxiety.

In the study, however, CBD was ineffective in treating bipolar disorder. The study also emphasized that further research on the use of CBD alone to treat the disorders mentioned above is needed. Dosing may be the reason that it did not show efficacy in bipolar.

The researchers recognize CBD and CBD compounds’ therapeutic potential in relieving symptoms of psychosis and improving cognitive impairment due to various conditions.

Another study published in the journal Molecular Neurobiology demonstrated that compared to some antidepressants, CBD takes effect faster. Depression medications have a “substantial time lag” before taking effect in the body (12).

How CBD Oil Works to Alleviate Symptoms of Depression

Researchers have found that CBD interacts with 5-HT1A receptors (13). This produces anxiolytic and antidepressant effects in the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) of the brain. 

dlPAG is the region of the brain that mediates aversive emotional experiences.

A 5-HT1A receptor is a serotonin receptor subtype that can be found in the brain. When this receptor is activated, it helps in the mechanism of action of antidepressant, anxiolytic, and antipsychotic drugs (14).  

Postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors are located in the areas of the brain responsible for the control of mood, cognition, and memory. Therefore, these serotonin receptors can help in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders (15)

5-HT1A receptors are essential in curbing depression. For instance, antidepressants increase postsynaptic 5-HT1A signaling (16)

Suicide patients were also observed to have reduced numbers of the receptor. Researchers have also concluded that the dysfunction of 5-HT1A receptors could result in depressive disorders (17)

A study in 2010 conducted in rodents has proven that CBD activates 5-HT1A receptors, producing anxiolytic effects in the test subjects (18).

As a substance with antidepressant-like effects, CBD also aids in increasing the expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Depressed animals and humans exhibit decreased levels of BDNF (19)

BDNF is a protein that is essential in the growth and survival of neurons (20)

A 2018 study outlines that CBD increases the release of BDNF, which helps in brain neuroplasticity, particularly new synaptic formation and cell proliferation (21). Neuroplasticity is required to achieve antidepressant effects in the test subject.

As an antidepressant, CBD also contributes to hippocampal neurogenesis. It is the production of new neurons in the hippocampus. 

A study conducted in mice has shown that the production of neurons in the hippocampus attenuates depression-related behaviors (22)

Research published in the journal Current Neuropharmacology investigates the link between the endocannabinoid system (ECS), the formation of neurons, and antidepressants (23).

The ECS regulates several functions like mood, appetite, sleep, memory, fertility, and reproduction. The study says that when CB1 and CB2 are manipulated, they can contribute to the formation of neurons in the hippocampus.

CB1 and CB2 are cannabinoid receptors.

Three types of cannabinoids interact with the ECS, namely endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and lab-derived cannabinoids.

The body produces endocannabinoids. Phytocannabinoids, meanwhile, are derived from the cannabis or marijuana plant. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and CBD are the most notable phytocannabinoids. THC is the psychoactive ingredient of cannabis plants.

A study in 2018 was conducted on cannabis users. According to the research, prolonged use of cannabis can have detrimental effects on the hippocampus, primarily due to the THC component (24).

The study revealed that CBD has neuroprotective properties that could reverse these effects. It also concluded that CBD helps in hippocampal neurogenesis. Researchers discovered that CBD’s proneurogenic action has anxiolytic effects.

The 2018 study recommended that CBD can be used in treating cannabis dependence and several psychiatric disorders involving hippocampal pathologies. These disorders include schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, and major depressive disorder.

The Pros and Cons of CBD Oil for Depression

The Pros

  • Human and animal studies have revealed CBD’s therapeutic effects on the symptoms of psychiatric conditions like depression.
  • Antidepressants have several side effects like insomnia, headaches, chronic pain in the joints and muscles, skin rashes, stomach upset, diarrhea, and nausea (25). The most adverse effect is reduced blood clotting, but that is rare. CBD, meanwhile, has minimal side effects. The most common are tiredness, diarrhea, and changes in appetite or weight (26)
  • The World Health Organization reveals that CBD does not develop physical dependence in humans (27). Hence, it is not a potential substance that can be abused. 
  • Prescription is not needed in purchasing CBD products as long as CBD use is legal in the region.

The Cons

  • More studies need to be conducted to determine if CBD can be used in treating psychiatric disorders, especially the more serious ones.
  • The United States (US) Food and Drug Administration has not approved the use of CBD for conditions other than epilepsy. Hence, there is no standard dosage for treating anxiety and depression with CBD.
  • There are possible drug interactions between CBD and antidepressants. Cytochrome P450 metabolizes antidepressants. CBD may inhibit these enzymes, thereby reducing the antidepressants’ efficacy (28)
  • Because CBD is not FDA-approved, products are not regulated. Discrepancies have been found on some CBD product labels and the amount of CBD they contain (29)

Depression vs. Anxiety

Anxiety and depression are detrimental to those who have them. These disorders significantly affect not only their health and well-being but also their social life and productivity.

These disorders are closely linked, but they are still different from each other. Depression is a more severe condition. Anxiety disorders could also trigger depression.

According to the Mental Health Foundation in the United Kingdom, there are different types of anxiety. These include:

  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Panic disorder
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder 
  • Social anxiety disorder
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Specific phobias

A panic disorder is a sudden attack of panic or fear. Phobias meanwhile vary per person. They could range from an overwhelming fear of enclosed spaces to fear of specific objects, situations, and even feelings.

They may have different treatments, but they generally share the same symptoms like restlessness, a feeling of dread or being “on-edge,” irritability, and difficulty concentrating and sleeping (30)

The causes of anxiety vary, but it is usually caused by biological factors like genetics or chronic physical ailments and injuries. Psychological or social factors also contribute to anxiety. These include experiences of poverty, childhood trauma, employment status, living or work environments, and family and personal relationships.

Depression meanwhile could vary in people, from mild to severe. The symptoms are also different, but depressed people, in general, feel an encompassing sadness or hopelessness (31)

Other symptoms include tiredness and loss of energy, difficulty sleeping or waking up earlier than usual, loss of confidence and self-esteem, difficulty concentrating, perennial anxiety, avoidance of people, difficulty in functioning, intense feelings of guilt or worthlessness, sexual dysfunction, physical aches and pains, difficulty functioning in the daily such as in work or school, and constant thoughts about self-harm and suicide (32).

Depression and anxiety share similar causes, but depression is a more complicated condition. Aside from the causes of anxiety that were already mentioned, depression is also caused by sudden life-changing events. These include pregnancies, life-threatening diseases like cancer, heart disease, back pain, and diabetes.

How CBD Oil Compares to Alternative Treatments for Depression

Psychiatric disorders like depression should not be left untreated as they can worsen. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) or antidepressants are usually used for these.

SSRIs are prescription drugs and cannot be bought over the counter. They are also used as anxiety medications. 

Examples of these antidepressant medications include Citalopram (Celexa), Escitalopram (Lexapro), Fluoxetine (Prozac), Paroxetine (Paxil, Pexeva), and Sertraline (Zoloft). 

While these medications treat depression, it takes a while before the drugs take effect on the body. These medications also have side effects that can be adverse to the body. 

More people are turning to natural alternatives like herbal supplements and even lifestyle changes like more frequent exercise to help treat depression.  

Most people go to psychological therapies and support groups. They employ self-help and self-management approaches to treat their major depressive disorder. 

Some people also take natural supplements like St. John’s wort. The herb reduces levels of cortisol, a stress-related hormone. It also increases neurotransmitters’ levels of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine (33)

According to Harvard Medical School, however, using St. John’s wort was not as effective as prescription medications like antidepressants. It also causes similar side effects (34)

When taken alongside antidepressants, St. John’s wort may cause serotonin syndrome. This potentially fatal disorder happens when excess serotonin builds up in the body. 

Exercise is also useful in treating several health conditions, including depression. It gives the body feel-good chemicals called endorphins and aids in nerve cell growth in the hippocampus (35).

According to a study, exercise increases BDNF levels in the brain, thereby contributing to the improvement of depression (36)

CBD could supplement self-help activities like exercise. 

CBD for Better Sleep

Those with depression have trouble with sleep. Studies showed that CBD vastly improved sleep (37) and increased its duration (38).

CBD may reduce insomnia, too (39)

CBD for Stress Reduction

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (40), CBD may reduce the behavioral and physiological signs of stress and anxiety. Heart rate, for instance, normalizes when CBD is administered. 

CBD for Mood Stabilization

Another study has found that CBD has mood-stabilizing effects (41). Clinical trials have shown that CBD is well-tolerated and effective in patients with psychosis.

The study also highlights the promise of further research on CBD treatment and CBD’s antipsychotic properties.  

CBD for Brain Function

CBD may also help improve cognition. Test subjects in a 2018 study (42) have shown improvements in memory, verbal learning, and attentional switching.

How to Choose the Right CBD for Depression

There are three types of CBD oils patients with depression can choose from, which are full-spectrum CBD oil, broad-spectrum, and isolates.

Full-spectrum CBD oil utilizes all the components of a cannabis plant, including trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), terpenes, flavonoids, fatty acids, and essential oils. This type of CBD is found to be the most effective because all the active ingredients of the plant synergize for maximum therapeutic effect, known as the entourage effect. 

THC, however, may cause mild psychoactive effects in people and can be detected via drug tests. For those who want to avoid these risks, using broad-spectrum CBD may prove useful.

Broad-spectrum CBD oils contain all the components of full-spectrum oils sans the THC. Those who solely want to use CBD in its purest form or are allergic to other components of the hemp plant may purchase CBD isolates. They are pure CBD, as they only have isolated cannabidiol.

CBD oil is different from hemp oil and hemp seed oil, because CBD comes from the flowers, stalks, and leaves of a hemp plant and contains higher levels of CBD than hemp oil. Hemp seed oil, meanwhile, is an oil extracted from raw hemp seeds. Hence, there are only trace amounts of CBD or none at all.

Full-spectrum hemp extract is also available in the market. 

It is also essential to ensure that patients with depression only purchase CBD of the highest quality. CBD buyers should consider the following before making a purchase:

  1. Check the state laws where the CBD products are bought and administered.
  2. Ensure that the brand carrying the CBD products are legitimate. Products of high quality are non-GMO and certified organic hemp-derived.
  3. If the purchase is made online, read up on the CBD brand. Look for reviews first and double-check if the store has been authorized by the government to sell CBD. Some brands even have money-back guarantee policies to assure buyers that their products are of high quality. 
  4. Research on the extraction process of the CBD oil before purchasing. It has different extraction methods like solvent or ethanol extraction. A study reports that the US FDA in pharmaceutical manufacturing recognizes CO2 extraction as a safe process (43). It has also started to become an industry standard. Some of the most natural carrier oils used in the extraction methods include MCT oil (medium-chain triglycerides from coconut oil), extra-virgin olive oil, and hemp seed oil.
  5. Check if the product has accessible batch testing reports. These are lab analyses from third-party labs that certify the quality and ingredients of the CBD product. A study in 2018 has employed third-party lab testing in 84 products that have been bought online (44). Researchers have discovered that of the 84 CBD products, 26% contained less CBD than labeled. 43% had more CBD than what the label declared, while 21% had THC concentrations that were enough to get children high.
  6. Consult with a doctor first before buying a CBD product.

Best CBD Oil for Depression 

Editor's Pick

Spruce 750mg Lab Grade CBD Oil

Specifically formulated to be more palatable to CBD users
Spruce 750mg Lab Grade CBD Oil Bottle
  • Overall Clinical Score
    99%
    Editor's Pick
  • Clinical Scores
    Value
    Quality
    Strength
    Customer Service
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Effectiveness
    Perfect for...New CBD users
  • Summary

    Each bottle of the 750mg CBD oil tincture contains 25mg of CBD per dropper full. The oil is peppermint flavor to mask any unpleasant tastes related to CBD.

    Pro's
    Cons's
     Mid-strength  No other flavors
     Natural peppermint flavor
     Made from 100% organic and natural ingredients
  • Features
    Discount pricing available? 20% Off Coupon Code: CBDCLINICALS
    Source
    Source of Hemp
    Kentucky, USA & North Carolina, USA
    Form Oil Tincture
    Ingredients Organic Hemp Seed Oil, Full Spectrum CBD Oil
    Type
    Type of CBD
    Full Spectrum
    Extraction
    Extraction Method
    Moonshine extraction method
    How to take it Under tongue
    Potency
    Potency - CBD Per Bottle
    750 mg per bottle
    Carrier Oil Organic Hemp Seed Oil
    Concentration
    CBD Concentration Per Serving
    25mg of CBD per dropper full (1ml)
    Drug Test Contains 0.3% THC but there is a chance you may test positive for marijuana
    Flavours Peppermint
    Price Range $89 ($75.65 for subscriptions, 15% discount from regular price)
    $/mg CBD
    Price ($/mg)
    $0.12/mg ($0.10/mg with subscription)
    Shipping
    Shipping/Time to delivery
    2-4 business days (first class USPS)
    Lab Tests
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Third Party Lab Tested post formulation for safety and potency, available on website
    Contaminants Organic, Non-GMO, no pesticides, no herbicides, no solvents or chemical fertilizers, No preservatives or sweeteners
    Allergens Vegan, Gluten free
    Refund policy Within 30 days
    Recommended for New CBD users
    Countries served USA only (all 50 states)
Check Latest Prices
Best Organic

NuLeaf Naturals 900mg Full Spectrum Hemp CBD Oil

Perfect for anyone who are looking for CBD products that promote a healthy body and mind.
NuLeaf Naturals 900mg Full Spectrum Hemp CBD Oil
  • Overall Clinical Score
    99%
    Best Organic
  • Clinical Scores
    Value
    Quality
    Strength
    Customer Service
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Effectiveness
    Perfect for...Health-conscious persons
  • Summary

    Natural remedy for various illnesses. NuLeaf Naturals’ CBD oil is a whole-plant extract containing a full spectrum of naturally occurring synergistic cannabinoids and terpenes.

    Pro's
    Cons's
     Pure CBD hemp  No other flavors
     All natural
     Approximately 300 drops total
  • Features
    Discount pricing available? 20% Off Coupon Code: CBDCLINICALS20
    Source
    Source of Hemp
    Colorado, USA
    Form Oil Tincture
    Ingredients Full Spectrum Hemp Extract, Organic Virgin Hemp Seed Oil
    Type
    Type of CBD
    Full Spectrum CBD
    Extraction
    Extraction Method
    CO2 Method
    How to take it Under the tongue for approximately 30 seconds before swallowing
    Potency
    Potency - CBD Per Bottle
    900mg per bottle
    Carrier Oil Organic Hemp Oil
    Concentration
    CBD Concentration Per Serving
    60mg per dropper full (1ml)
    Drug Test Contains 0.3% THC but there is a chance you may test positive for marijuana
    Flavours Natural
    Price Range $99 - $434
    $/mg CBD
    Price ($/mg)
    $0.08 - $0.13
    Shipping
    Shipping/Time to delivery
    2-3 Days via USPS
    Lab Tests
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Third Party Lab Tested post formulation for safety and potency, available on website
    Contaminants No additives or preservatives, Non-GMO, NO herbicides, pesticides, or chemical fertilizers
    Allergens Not specified
    Refund policy Within 30 days
    Recommended for Health-conscious persons
    Countries served USA (all 50 states) and over 40 countries including Australia, Azerbaijan, Beliza, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Brazil, Chile, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Hong Kong, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Macao, Malaysia, Malta, Netherlands, New Zealand, Oman, Paraguay, Poland, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, and many more.
Check Latest Prices
Best Customer Service

Sabaidee Super Good Vibes CBD Oil

4x the strength of a regular cbd oil
Sabaidee Super Good Vibes CBD Oil
  • Overall Clinical Score
    99%
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    Perfect for...Patients who are looking for serious CBD oil support
  • Summary

    Super Good Vibes CBD Oil provides the purest and highest quality Cannabidiol (CBD) on the market as well as other high quality phytocannabinoids, terpenes, vitamins, omega fatty acids, trace minerals, and other beneficial for your health elements, which all work together to provide benefits.

    Pro's
    Cons's
     Extra strong  No other flavors
     Significant benefits with just a few drops
     100% Natural ingredients
  • Features
    Discount pricing available? 15% Off Coupon Code: CBDCLINICALS15
    Source
    Source of Hemp
    Colorado, USA
    Form Oil Tincture
    Ingredients Cannabidiol (CBD), Coconut Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) Oil, Peppermint oil
    Type
    Type of CBD
    Broad Spectrum
    Extraction
    Extraction Method
    CO2-extraction
    How to take it Using 1-3 servings per day as needed is a good start to determine how much you need
    Potency
    Potency - CBD Per Bottle
    1000 mg per bottle
    Carrier Oil Coconut MCT Oil
    Concentration
    CBD Concentration Per Serving
    33.5 mg per dropper (1ml)
    Drug Test Contains 0.3% THC but there is a chance you may test positive for marijuana
    Flavours Peppermint
    Price Range Single Bottle - $119.95, 2-Pack - $109.97 each, 3-Pack - $98.31 each, 6-Pack - $79.99 each
    $/mg CBD
    Price ($/mg)
    Single bottle - $0.010, 2-Pack - $0.011, 3-Pack - $0.009, 6-Pack - $0.007
    Shipping
    Shipping/Time to delivery
    3-5 Business days
    Lab Tests
    Lab Testing Transparency
    Third Party Lab Tested post formulation for safety and potency, available on website
    Contaminants Contaminant-free
    Allergens Vegan and Gluten-free
    Refund policy Within 30 days
    Recommended for Patients who are looking for serious CBD oil support
    Countries served USA only (all 50 states)
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cbdMD CBD Oil Tinctures

Uses USA hemp that is grown on non-GMO farms, and is both vegan and gluten-free
cbdMD CBD Oil Tinctures Products
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    Natural Alternative
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    Perfect for...CBD users with different needs
  • Summary

    cbdMD’s CBD oil tinctures are made using only CBD sourced from medical hemp and MCT oil as a carrier oil. Tinctures are offered in orange, mint, natural, and berry flavors. Safe for daily use, the oil tinctures are packaged with a built-in rubber dropper to adjust CBD dosage easily. The packaging is made to be easy to transport and discreet to use.

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    Cons's
     Plenty of concentrations to choose from for all people with various kinds of needs  cbdMD uses MCT as its carrier oil so individuals who are allergic with coconuts should consider other brand options
     Has vegan, organic, and gluten-free ingredients
     Affordable pricing
     Affordable pricing
  • Features
    Discount pricing available? 15% Off Coupon Code: cbdMD15
    Source
    Source of Hemp
    Kentucky, USA
    Form Oil Tincture
    Ingredients Cannabidiol (CBD), MCT Oil, and Flavoring
    Type
    Type of CBD
    Broad Spectrum
    Extraction
    Extraction Method
    CO2 extraction method
    How to take it Under tongue
    Potency
    Potency - CBD Per Bottle
    300 mg - 7500 mg / 30 ml bottle, 1000 mg - 1500 mg / 60 ml bottle
    Carrier Oil Organic Coconut MCT Oil
    Concentration
    CBD Concentration Per Serving
    30 ml: 300 mg - 10 mg per dropper (1ml), 750 mg - 25 mg per dropper (1ml), 1500 mg - 50 mg per dropper (1ml), 3000 mg - 100 mg per dropper (1ml), 5000 mg - 166.6 mg per dropper (1ml), 7500 mg - 250 mg per dropper (1ml), 60 ml: 1000 mg - 16.6 mg per dropper (1ml), 1500 mg - 25 mg per dropper (1ml)
    Drug Test Containing less than 0.3% THC, there are still trace amounts
    Flavours Natural, Berry, Orange and Mint
    Price Range 30 ml Bottles: $29.99 for 300 mg, $69.99 for 750 mg, $99.99 for 1500 mg, $149.99 for 3000 mg, $239.99 for 5000 mg, $339.99 for 7500 mg 60 ml Bottles: $74.99 for 1000 mg, $99.99 for 1500 mg
    $/mg CBD
    Price ($/mg)
    30 ml - $0.05 - $0.10, 60 ml - $0.06 - $0.07
    Shipping
    Shipping/Time to delivery
    2-5 Business days (via Fedex)
    Lab Tests
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    Third Party Lab Tested post formulation for safety and potency, available on website
    Contaminants 100% organic, non-GMO, and vegan-certified
    Allergens Vegan, Gluten free
    Refund policy Within 30 days
    Recommended for CBD users with different needs
    Countries served USA only (all 50 states)
Check Latest Prices

CBD Dosage For Depression

Because the US FDA has not approved CBD use, there is no standard dosage chart for patients who want to take CBD. It is advised that they should consult with a doctor first as a medical professional would give the dosage that is most apt for the patient.

A 2019 study was conducted on males that were given different doses of CBD (150 mg, 300 mg, 600 mg, and placebo) (45). The test subjects exhibited varying results when it comes to reducing their anxiety before giving a speech. 

The anxiolytic effect of CBD was only observed on those that were administered with 300 mg of CBD.

How to Take CBD Oil for Depression

There are several ways to take CBD. It all depends on which form would suit the lifestyle of the patient best.

CBD products can be taken sublingually (under the tongue), swallowed, or vaped. They come in different formulations, like CBD oil, sprays, CBD oil tinctures (drops), soft gels, or capsules. These may be consumed directly or, if they are unflavored, combined with food or beverages. 

The upside of getting CBD capsules is that they can be conveniently brought anywhere. CBD tinctures and CBD oil meanwhile allow patients to adjust the dosage of the product quickly. 

Tinctures may be taken sublingually by using the dropper to apply CBD oil under the tongue for around 60 to 90 seconds before swallowing. 

CBD oil for depression treatment can also be used during massages. There are peppermint-infused oils that could be therapeutic, especially to patients who need to be relieved of stress.

CBD is also available as edibles such as gummies. Some brands offer gummies that are vegan and gluten-free.

There is also a market for people who prefer their CBD in vape form. It is a popular method because users ingest the substance in an instant, thereby giving the quickest results. 

A 2020 study states the bioavailability of CBD is higher when it is inhaled (11 to 43%) compared to when it is orally ingested (11 to 13%) (46)

Though the effects are instantaneous because CBD enters the bloodstream via the lungs and not the digestive system, vaping can lead to throat irritation or coughing. 

Another downside when using CBD vape or vape pens is that the amount of CBD taken in each draw cannot be determined. The results also last for 30 minutes to an hour or two at most.

Studies need to be done on whether vaping can cause lung problems, so it is recommended to proceed with caution before deciding to inhale CBD via vape pens.

CBD is also available in topical forms like creams and lotions. Topical CBD products are usually used for pain and inflammation management, but seldom for treating depression.

Topical CBD has limited absorption. It is best to purchase products that indicate the use of nanotechnology, encapsulation, or CBD micellization. These mean the CBD can be transmitted through dermal layers instead of only staying on the skin.

Conclusion

Several studies show the health benefits of CBD in managing the symptoms of depression. However, research on whether CBD alone can suffice in treating the said psychiatric disorders is still lacking.

CBD has anxiolytic, antipsychotic, and antidepressant properties. It activates 5-HT1A receptors, resulting in the reduction of depression.

CBD also increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which has low levels in depressed animals and humans. 

Part of CBD’s antidepressant properties is its ability to facilitate the formation of neurons in the hippocampus. Hippocampal neurogenesis enhances the mood of those who take CBD.

CBD can also help improve sleep, reduce stress, enhance cognitive function, and stabilize mood, thereby making it useful in managing symptoms of depression.

Despite these developments, more research still needs to be done. However, it should be recognized that CBD has much potential in treating depression, especially since it has minimal side effects compared to SSRIs.

Before administering CBD to patients with depression, it is best to consult with a medical professional first.


  1. Crippa, José A et al. “Translational Investigation of the Therapeutic Potential of Cannabidiol (CBD): Toward a New Age.” Frontiers in immunology vol. 9 2009. 21 Sep. 2018, doi:10.3389/fimmu.2018.02009
  2. Ibid.
  3. de Mello Schier, Alexandre R et al. “Antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of cannabidiol: a chemical compound of Cannabis sativa.” CNS & neurological disorders drug targets vol. 13,6 (2014): 953-60. doi:10.2174/1871527313666140612114838
  4. Beale, Camilla et al. “Prolonged Cannabidiol Treatment Effects on Hippocampal Subfield Volumes in Current Cannabis Users.” Cannabis and cannabinoid research vol. 3,1 94-107. 1 Apr. 2018, doi:10.1089/can.2017.0047
  5. Bergamaschi, Mateus M et al. “Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in treatment-naïve social phobia patients.” Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology vol. 36,6 (2011): 1219-26. doi:10.1038/npp.2011.6
  6. Shannon, Scott et al. “Cannabidiol in Anxiety and Sleep: A Large Case Series.” The Permanente journal vol. 23 (2019): 18-041. doi:10.7812/TPP/18-041
  7. Blessing, Esther M et al. “Cannabidiol as a Potential Treatment for Anxiety Disorders.” Neurotherapeutics : the journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics vol. 12,4 (2015): 825-36. doi:10.1007/s13311-015-0387-1
  8. de Mello Schier, A. 2014. op. cit. 
  9. Crippa, J. 2018 Sep. 21. op. cit. 
  10. Laczkovics, C., Kothgassner, O.D., Felnhofer, A. et al. Cannabidiol treatment in an adolescent with multiple substance abuse, social anxiety and depression. Neuropsychiatr (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40211-020-00334-0
  11. Khan, R., Naveed, S., Mian, N. et al. The therapeutic role of Cannabidiol in mental health: a systematic review. J Cannabis Res 2, 2 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s42238-019-0012-y
  12. Sales, Amanda J et al. “Cannabidiol Induces Rapid and Sustained Antidepressant-Like Effects Through Increased BDNF Signaling and Synaptogenesis in the Prefrontal Cortex.” Molecular neurobiology vol. 56,2 (2019): 1070-1081. doi:10.1007/s12035-018-1143-4
  13. de Mello Schier, A. 2014. op. cit. 
  14. “5-HT1A Receptors in Psychopharmacology.” Edited by Flavio Guzman, Psychopharmacology Institute, psychopharmacologyinstitute.com/publication/5-ht1a-receptors-in-psychopharmacology-2123.
  15. Guzman, F. op. cit. 
  16. Ibid.
  17. Ibid. 
  18. Zanelati, T V et al. “Antidepressant-like effects of cannabidiol in mice: possible involvement of 5-HT1A receptors.” British journal of pharmacology vol. 159,1 (2010): 122-8. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2009.00521.x
  19. de Mello Schier, A. 2014. op. cit. 
  20. Bathina, Siresha, and Undurti N Das. “Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its clinical implications.” Archives of medical science : AMS vol. 11,6 (2015): 1164-78. doi:10.5114/aoms.2015.56342
  21. Sartim, Ariandra G., et al. “Hippocampal Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Is Implicated in Stress-Coping Behavior Induced by Cannabidiol in the Forced Swim Test.” Journal of Psychopharmacology, vol. 32, no. 8, Aug. 2018, pp. 922–931, doi:10.1177/0269881118784877.
  22. Hill, Alexis S et al. “Increasing Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis is Sufficient to Reduce Anxiety and Depression-Like Behaviors.” Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology vol. 40,10 (2015): 2368-78. doi:10.1038/npp.2015.85
  23. Fogaça, Manoela Viar et al. “Cannabinoids, Neurogenesis and Antidepressant Drugs: Is there a Link?.” Current neuropharmacology vol. 11,3 (2013): 263-75. doi:10.2174/1570159X11311030003
  24. Beale, C. 2018 Apr. 1. op. cit. 
  25. Health Publishing. “What Are the Real Risks of Antidepressants?” Harvard Health, Mar. 2014, www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/what-are-the-real-risks-of-antidepressants.
  26. Iffland, Kerstin, and Franjo Grotenhermen. “An Update on Safety and Side Effects of Cannabidiol: A Review of Clinical Data and Relevant Animal Studies.” Cannabis and cannabinoid research vol. 2,1 139-154. 1 Jun. 2017, doi:10.1089/can.2016.0034
  27. “CANNABIDIOL (CBD) Critical Review Report.” World Health Organization, 2018.
  28. Yamaori S, Ebisawa J, Okushima Y, Yamamoto I, Watanabe K. Potent inhibition of human cytochrome P450 3A isoforms by cannabidiol: role of phenolic hydroxyl groups in the resorcinol moiety. Life Sci. 2011 Apr 11;88(15-16):730-6. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2011.02.017. Epub 2011 Feb 26.
  29. Freedman, Daniel A, and Anup D Patel. “Inadequate Regulation Contributes to Mislabeled Online Cannabidiol Products.” Pediatric neurology briefs vol. 32 3. 18 Jun. 2018, doi:10.15844/pedneurbriefs-32-3
  30. “Anxiety.” Mental Health Foundation, 12 Jan. 2018, www.mentalhealth.org.uk/a-to-z/a/anxiety.
  31. “Depression.” Mental Health Foundation, 15 Jan. 2018, www.mentalhealth.org.uk/a-to-z/d/depression.
  32. Ibid.
  33. Harvard Health Publishing. “Herbal and Dietary Supplements for Depression.” Harvard Health, Oct. 2008, www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/Herbal_and_dietary_supplements_for_depression.
  34. Ibid. 
  35. Harvard Health Publishing. “Exercise Is an All-Natural Treatment to Fight Depression.” Harvard Health, July 2013, www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/exercise-is-an-all-natural-treatment-to-fight-depression.
  36. Bathina, S. op. cit. 
  37. Shannon, S. 2019 Jan. 7. op. cit. 
  38. Chagas, Marcos Hortes N., et al. “Effects of Acute Systemic Administration of Cannabidiol on Sleep-Wake Cycle in Rats.” Journal of Psychopharmacology, vol. 27, no. 3, Mar. 2013, pp. 312–316, doi:10.1177/0269881112474524.
  39. Carlini, E A, and J M Cunha. “Hypnotic and antiepileptic effects of cannabidiol.” Journal of clinical pharmacology vol. 21,S1 (1981): 417S-427S. doi:10.1002/j.1552-4604.1981.tb02622.x
  40. National Institute on Drug Abuse. “The Biology and Potential Therapeutic Effects of Cannabidiol.” NIDA Archives, 24 June 2015, archives.drugabuse.gov/testimonies/2015/biology-potential-therapeutic-effects-cannabidiol.
  41. Davies, Cathy, and Sagnik Bhattacharyya. “Cannabidiol as a Potential Treatment for Psychosis.” Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology, Jan. 2019, doi:10.1177/2045125319881916.
  42. Solowij, Nadia et al. “Therapeutic Effects of Prolonged Cannabidiol Treatment on Psychological Symptoms and Cognitive Function in Regular Cannabis Users: A Pragmatic Open-Label Clinical Trial.” Cannabis and cannabinoid research vol. 3,1 21-34. 1 Mar. 2018, doi:10.1089/can.2017.0043
  43. Kankala, Ranjith Kumar et al. “Solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids: an ecofriendly nanonization approach for processing biomaterials and pharmaceutical compounds.” International journal of nanomedicine vol. 13 4227-4245. 23 Jul. 2018, doi:10.2147/IJN.S166124
  44. Freedman, D. 2018 Jun. 18. 
  45. Linares, Ila M et al. “Cannabidiol presents an inverted U-shaped dose-response curve in a simulated public speaking test.” Revista brasileira de psiquiatria (Sao Paulo, Brazil : 1999) vol. 41,1 (2019): 9-14. doi:10.1590/1516-4446-2017-0015
  46. Khan, R. 2020 Jan. 2. op. cit.

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Why I Promised to Take Care of My Mental Health in My Wedding Vows

By Lauren Abdill

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WeddingOne month ago today, my partner Rich and I stood under a big tent during the loveliest late-summer rain storm and did a really wonderful thing:  We got married.

 

Our wedding was beautiful and special and fun and silly — all the things we had hoped it would be during the months of planning. We stood under the alter in front of our friends and family, and I promised all the typical things you promise in your wedding vows — to love him and support him and take care of him when he’s sick, etc.

 

But there was one thing I added that wasn’t so typical: that I would take care of myself and my mental health, too.

 

It wasn’t surprising to Rich that I included this in my vows. Mental health — both mine and his — has played an important role in our four-year-long relationship.

 

Rich and I started dating my junior year of college, about seven months after I was sexually assaulted. At this time, I hadn’t told anyone about my rape and was struggling greatly (and quietly) with PTSD and depression. I remember thinking I never would be able to say out loud what had happened to me.

 

And then, one night when we were hanging out shortly before we became “official,” I said it. I couldn’t believe it and certainly hadn’t planned it. It was like this part of me had been waiting for the right person to come along — someone who I absolutely knew wouldn’t judge or doubt me — and then there he was.

 

My recovery has been a big part of our relationship. It’s taken a lot of work over the last few years for me to get to a place where I could walk down the aisle without this big traumatic cloud hovering over me. And Rich has been there for every step of it — finding new therapists, upping my medicine dosage, learning new coping mechanisms to deal with my intense anxiety, dealing with terrible nightmares every single night.

 

We talk about my mental health as casually as we talk about what we’re having for dinner. I tell him when I’m having bad days (happy to say they’re pretty few-and-far between now) or when something triggers me or when I need a little more support than usual.

 

We talk about his mental health, too. It’s not easy to be the spouse of a sexual assault survivor and he’s had to learn his own coping mechanisms. But we talk about it and we work through it. There’s absolutely no stigma in our relationship; that’s one of the things I love most about it

 

So it made perfect sense for me to talk about my mental health in my vows. Here’s how it went:

 

“I vow to always make you coffee when I’m the first one up on Sunday. When you’re telling me a joke or about a bad day, I vow to listen to you — and actually listen, not just kind of listen but really I’m watching Netflix. I vow to take care of you when you’re sick. I vow to bug you to go to the dentist regularly, no matter how annoying it is. I vow to do my very best to cheer you up when you’re feeling down. And just like I promise to take care of you, I promise to take care of myself, too. I promise to go to my therapy appointments and take my medicine and write in my journal and practice self-care and love myself as much as you love me. I promise this because I know that the health of our relationship is only as strong as our individual health, so I vow to hold up my end of the bargain as best as I can.”

 

I’ve been doing really well for the last two years. I found a therapist I adore and my medicine is working like it should. But our marriage will (hopefully!) be long and I know there will be days when I’m not doing so great. There will be days when it’s easier to stay in bed then get up and write what I’m feeling in my journal. There will days when recovery seems out of reach and I want to throw in the towel.

 

But I’ll do my best to keep fighting. I’ll do it because I love my husband. And I’ll do it because I love myself, too.

 

Later, on our way to our Alaskan honeymoon, I asked Rich what his favorite part of the wedding was. He said it was the part about mental health in my vows.

 

I’m so lucky he’s my husband.

 

 Date October 12, 2015

 Author Lauren Abdill

 Tags PTSD, recovery, sexual assault

 

10 Holiday Survival Tips from the Active Minds Speakers Bureau

By Lee Ann Gardner

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What is it about the holiday season that stresses us out? The six weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day can seem like the longest, most angst-filled time of the whole year, even though the days are short!

 

Even if you don’t ordinarily experience anxiety, depression, mood swings or other mental health issues, itmay not be uncommon for you to feel a little less grounded at the end of the year. And if you are dealing with a disorder, the symptoms may be magnified right about now. If so, read on.

 

You may already have some coping mechanisms in place for when you feel anxious; however, as a small holiday gift, the Active Minds speakers would like to offer you some of their own tips for surviving the holidays with good mental (and physical) health intact.

 

Frank Warren: “My one tip for stress reduction is exercise. I feel like I get similar benefits of relaxation and focus from endurance exercise as others might get from meditation or yoga. My favorite workouts are spinning, pool laps and kicking. Don’t forget to hydrate—coconut water, protein drinks and even plain tap water are my go-tos.”

 

Meg Hutchinson: “Remembering to spend at least an hour every day totally gadget-free out in the woods – I call it ‘sky time;’ I also like to remind myself of Viktor Frankl’s quote ” Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”

 

Stacy Pershall: “Hot yoga every day! Seriously, that’s my primary coping strategy right now. I’ve become a little obsessed.”

 

Kevin Briggs: “Put some time aside to have coffee/tea with friends/family and let them know how important they are in your life. For me, December is also a time of reflection. Reflect on what you’ve accomplished the past year, and set goals for next year. Be thankful for what you have and give something to those not as fortunate as you.”

 

Kai Roberts: “The holiday season can become pretty hectic. During this time of celebration, be sure to make time for yourself. This reflection time will keep you calm and grounded.”

 

Pablo Campos: “Sing or hum along with your favorite holiday song or even some of the annoying ones. That form of expression is a favorite one of mine that helps me think solely about the pitch of my voice and the song and not about everything else going on around me.”

 

Colleen Coffey: “Be right here, right now. Every single moment is a gift. We get just one life here on earth. When I am overwhelmed I breathe in and out and remind myself what I am grateful for. I breathe in what is good and true and breathe out the anxiousness and darkness and remind myself that I am grateful to be right here -right now.”

 

Juliana Kerrest: “Curl up with my warmest blanket, whichever pet is in the mood to snuggle, and a good book that is for pure-enjoyment’s sake.”

 

Janelle Montaño: “As days grow shorter, temperatures drop, and holiday celebrations begin, I remind myself the importance of fresh air!  Getting bundled up and taking a walk to the local coffee shop, library, or even through the neighborhood is food for my body, mind, and soul.”

 

Maggie Bertram: “Designate an ally who will save you from all those “what’re you going to do with your future” questions.”

 

So, no matter what else is going on this holiday season, remember to take some time to reward yourself for being an awesome person, and give yourself a gift–the gift of being good to yourself!

 

Happy Holidays!

 

 Date December 9, 2015

 Author Lee Ann Gardner

 Tags Active Minds Speakers Bureau, holiday, self-care

 

How to Live Happily with Depression & Anxiety

By Chris Elkins

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This blog is a guest post from DrugRehab.com. Learn more about addiction and recovery.

 

MOA-anxiety-depression-headlines

 

Everyone suffers from depression or anxiety at some point in life. The feelings are natural during times of high stress, transition or after a traumatic event. Starting college, a new class, moving away from home or preparing for finals can cause anxiety, sadness or both.

 

However, there are healthy ways to overcome depression and anxiety. The easiest ways are to reduce the amount of stress in your life.

 

Tips for managing moments of high stress or anxiety:

 

Take deep, slow breaths.

Count slowly in your head.

Force yourself to think positive thoughts.

Visualize success.

Take breaks from long projects.

Avoid alcohol and other drugs.

Daily tips for reducing feelings of depression and anxiety include:

 

Make sure to get enough sleep at night.

Eat a healthy, well-balanced diet.

Exercise moderately.

Take a yoga or meditation class.

Participate in creative activity such as playing music.

Avoid isolation by connecting with friends and family.

For some people, feelings of depression or anxiety last for long periods of time. They’re unable to overcome unhappy feelings without help. That’s when it’s time to find help.

 

If you’re suffering from intense sadness for more than two weeks or you feel persistent symptoms of anxiety for more than a month, you may be suffering from an anxiety disorder or a type of clinical depression.

 

Fortunately, most college campuses provide free mental health counseling services for students. Even if there isn’t a licensed therapist on campus, almost every college can refer students to a reputable therapist in the community.

 

Students should seek help from a therapist or counselor if they believe they are suffering from an anxiety disorder, depression or if they’re having thoughts of harming themselves or others. Talk therapy can often relieve symptoms of anxiety or depression.

 

In some situations, therapists may prescribe antidepressant or anti-anxiety medications. It’s important to talk to your therapist about the benefits and risks of medications and determine the best treatment for you.

 

Serious mental health problems can’t be cured with one or two therapy sessions. It takes time and hard work. Therapists will help you understand the underlying causes of sadness or anxiety and teach you strategies to overcome those feelings. It’s important to practice those strategies in between counseling sessions in addition to practicing the tips listed above.

 

Chris Elkins writes for DrugRehab.com — a comprehensive resource for addiction-related topics, including co-occurring mental health disorders and treatment options for recovery.

 

Sources:

 

  1. Anxiety and Depression Association of America. (2016). Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress.

 

  1. Mayo Clinic. (2013, June 11). Stress Management.

 

  1. National Institute of Mental Health. (2016, March). Anxiety Disorders.

 

  1. National Institute of Mental Health. (2016, March). Depression.

 

  1. Old Dominion University. (n.d.). Tips to Reduce Anxiety and Stress for College Students.

 

 Date March 28, 2016

 Author Chris Elkins

 Tags anxiety, depression, recovery

 

National Depression Screening Day: Treating Mental Health like Physical Health

By Katie Hickey

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Facebook_Profile_PictureMore often than not, when I have an anxiety attack, it’s the physical symptoms that first alert me. My heart feels like it’s pounding out of my chest, it is difficult to catch a breath, and I have an unnerving feeling that there is nothing I can do to calm down.

 

For me, my anxiety is very much a physical reality as well as a mental one, which is why our contradictory reactions to mental and physical illnesses as a society are often hard for me to understand.

 

And since today is National Depression Screening Day, it’s the perfect time to start closely examining these contradictory reactions and setting them straight.

 

Here’s the issue: It’s okay to discuss physical pain. “I’ve got such awful cramps,” or “my leg hurts from working out yesterday.” But what you don’t hear people saying is, “I’m feeling really hopeless today,” or “I feel so alone.”

 

We are probably all familiar with stigma and the powerful impact it can have on perceptions of mental illness. Stigma leads us to believe that sharing these feelings of sadness and anxiety are somehow an admission of weakness or the fault of the person who is feeling this way.

 

This perception and self-blame can often prevent us from having important conversations with our friends and loved ones, and, over time, can worsen the issue.

 

According to a recent report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, about 42.5 million American adults (or 18.2 percent of the total adult population) suffers from some form of mental illness every year.

 

And for those aged 18-25, the rate of mental illness is more than twice as high compared with those aged 50 and older (14.3 percent).

 

It’s no wonder that college students living with mental health concerns are speaking out and voicing the need for changes on campus.

 

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness report, College Students Speak: A Survey Report on Mental Health, an overwhelming number of survey respondents listed mental health as the reason they were no longer at school.

 

What did respondents list as ways to support mental health on campus? Training on mental health issues for faculty and staff was number one, followed closely by suicide prevention activities, student organizations or peer-run groups, and peer-to-peer support and mentoring.

 

With one-fifth of our population facing related issues, it’s time we change the way mental health is viewed on college campuses and in the United States.

 

Envision a world where mental health is discussed with the same gravity and respect as physical health; where there is no fear in seeking and receiving support; and where access to quality treatment is available to all.

 

We can create this world by educating ourselves about the signs and symptoms of common mental health disorders, raising awareness, and supporting our peers. National Depression Screening Day is October 9th and provides a great opportunity to help reduce stigma.

 

No matter what people say or how our society portrays it, mental illness is just as real as physical illness. It can cause the same amount of pain, can interfere with our daily lives, but most importantly, it can be treated.

 

Katie Hickey is the Marketing & Communications Coordinator at Mental Health Screening. 

 

 Date October 9, 2014

 Author Katie Hickey

 Tags depression, Mental Health Screening, National Depression Screening Day

 

Prevention & Awareness

Suicide Prevention Month: Untreated Depression

August 5, 2013June 18, 2014Stacy Pershall

An excerpt from Loud in the House of Myself: Memoir of a Strange Girl by Stacy Pershall, author and member of the Active Minds Speakers Bureau (pp. 133-135). The following excerpt details what it feels like to come to campus and have a bout of severe depression. 

 

I could swear the world was wrapped in a brown cloud the day I left for college. I felt like Pig-Pen in Peanuts, the kid whose vision is always obscured by his own filth. It was late August, with a high, bright sun, and kids were riding their bikes, and people were enjoying the last days of swimming pools and barbecues. I sunk into the backseat of my parents’ packed Mercury, angry at my new comforter for being in a plastic bag that kept sticking to my skin. I could smell the mall coming through the bag, and I thought about the mall and all the people in it, about the act of going somewhere and picking something out and waiting in line to pay for it and listening to other people’s children scream and stomp because they weren’t getting whatever stupid plastic thing had last entered their field of vision. My head pounded.

 

My roommate-to-be, Lindsay, had called me excitedly the day after I came home from London, bubbling about matching comforters and doing the entire room in black and white, and what did I think about that? I said sure, whatever. Turns out they had black and white bedding at JCPenney, and Lindsay had already picked it out, and it cost blah blah blah, and the sheets were blah blah blah, and beanbags and lamps blah blah. My mom took me to Penney’s and bought me the stuff Lindsay picked out, which made me feel guilty. I did not deserve an education—after all, compared to my friends in England, I was just some ignorant hill person going to an ignorant hill school in an ignorant hill town, what could I possibly have to offer the world? By the time we got to Hendrix, my parents and I were barely speaking—at issue was something about me being an ingrate—and I trudged up the stairs carrying boxes of things I ostensibly needed. I wondered whether it was too late to ask if I could live in a storage room and just sleep on a stack of books.

 

I was indeed an ingrate, and Hendrix was and still is an amazing school. But my depression obscured the truth. … A depressed person is selfish because her self, the very core of who she is, will not leave her alone, and she can no more stop thinking about this self and how to escape it than a prisoner held captive by a sadistic serial killer can forget about the person who comes in to torture her every day. Her body is brutalized by her mind. It hurts to breathe, sleep, eat, walk, think. The gross maneuverings of her limbs are so overwhelming, so wearying, that the fine muscle movements or quickness of wit necessary to write, to actually say something, are completely out of the question.

 

Are you in distress and ready to actually say something? Click here or call 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

 

Download Loud in the House of Myself on Audible.com.

 

Buy Stacy’s book at a local independent bookstore.

 

suicide prevention suicide prevention month

 

Tag: depression

What the Holidays Can Be Like With a Mental Illness

December 12, 2017 December 12, 2017 Active Minds Staff

 

For many, the holidays season is the best, most joyous time of the year. For others, it’s the opposite. Living with a mental illness is tough. And it’s even harder when you’re expected to be all happy and jolly, loving life with your friends and family. It’s hard to explain how an atmosphere of happiness…

 

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We Will Rise

December 8, 2017 Becky Fein

 

“Woah. This is fire weather.” My partner says from our Santa Rosa, California stoop on October 8th, that fateful and tragic 75-degree Sunday night. The wind was ripping through the streets at 60 miles per hour. The enormous redwood trees around us were flailing wildly, as though they were made of rubber. We were kept…

 

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You are Enough

December 7, 2017 December 7, 2017 Dago Acevedo

 

My time at Active Minds will be an experience I will truly treasure and remember. I can’t express how thankful I am for the individuals I was able to encounter, as well as the lessons I learned through hard-work and making mistakes. Yes, an internship is meant to provide you with experiences that shape your…

 

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EXPECTO PATRONUM! A Spell or a mantra?

July 18, 2017 Pablo Campos

 

Ever since being introduced to the Harry Potter books in elementary school I’ve felt a strong connection to the magical world that has taken me beyond that which I sometimes feel with my real life acquaintances. Attending book and movie releases helped me have something to look forward to, the characters’ growth something to guide…

 

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Active Minds T-shirt Design Contest Update

June 13, 2017Active Minds Staff

The Active Minds T-shirt Design contest is in full swing and we’ve received so many wonderful submissions, we just had to share a few of them with you. Every entry tells a different story of hope and resilience and we couldn’t be more proud of everyone who has taken the time to create something from…

 

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#StatusOfMind: Instagram and Snapchat and their effect on mental health

June 6, 2017 June 6, 2017 Danielle Swernofsky

 

Numerous studies have confirmed that social media usage can negatively impact mental health, but a new report called #StatusOfMind, published by Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) and the Young Health Movement (YHM), recently reported that Instagram, followed by Snapchat, is the worst social media app for young people’s mental health. Surveying around 1,500 people…

 

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Racism is Making Us Sick

May 5, 2017 Laura Horne

Help and hope are available. Over the last 14 years, Active Minds has empowered students facing mental health struggles to share their stories to let others know they’re not alone and to spread that message: help and hope are available. During my time as a member of the Active Minds team, I’ve come to recognize…

 

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Did You Hear about the Rose that Grew from Concrete?

May 3, 2017 May 3, 2017 Janae David

 

“Did you hear about the rose that grew from a crack in the concrete? Provin Nature’s laws wrong it learned how to walk without Havin feet Funny it seems but, by keepin its dreams It, learned to breathe FRESH air Long live the rose that grew from concrete When no one else even cared No…

 

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About Chris Gethard’s HBO Special: Career Suicide

May 1, 2017 May 2, 2017 Active Minds Staff

  HBO is airing a new comedy special called Chris Gethard: Career Suicide on Saturday, May 6. Active Minds is proud to serve as a resource for his first HBO comedy special. Many years ago Chris was a speaker at Active Minds’ national conference! Chris is a (wry, funny, makes-you-laugh-just-looking-at-him) comedian who talks about his own personal…

 

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In Memory of Amy Bleuel, Founder of Project Semicolon

March 31, 2017 March 31, 2017 Active Minds Staff

  The Active Minds community is so saddened to hear of Amy Bleuel’s death. Four years ago, Amy, the founder of Project Semicolon, posted a note on social media encouraging anyone who is depressed, unhappy, has anxiety, or is suicidal to draw a semicolon on their wrist. She wrote, “A semicolon represents a sentence the…

 

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depression

Mental Health Monologues at Winona State University

By Robyn Suchy

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MHM 2015Active Minds at Winona State University recently won Active Minds’ Programming Innovation Award for their mental health story-sharing program, the Mental Health Monologues (check out their videos)! Based on the highly popular Vagina Monologues, students, faculty, and staff (some as actors and others as authors of the stories) brought mental health struggles to life by reading personal experiences with mental illness  in a theatrical setting.

 

The overall goal of this program was to “erase the stigma surrounding mental health and show that there is hope of treatment and recovery for mental illness.” They hoped that this emotionally-charged public presentation of personal stories would reveal the ways in which mental illness affects different people, whether they are personally struggling or supporting a loved one.

 

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 Date December 21, 2015

 Author Robyn Suchy

 Tags anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, eating disorders, programming, story sharing

 

The White Balloon Could be Coming to Your Campus

By Libbi Ethier

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white balloonLooking for a creative way to start a conversation about mental health and engage a large population in your community or on your campus? Active Minds at Rochester Institute of Technology may have found one of the most creative ways yet to engage their campus, get the word out about their chapter, and educate their peers at the same time: they brought The White Balloon to their campus.

 

The goal of this program was to inform peers about the proportion of college students who live with mental illness in the United States. They accomplished this goal in three ways: balloons, mystery, and social media.

 

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 Date October 15, 2015

 Author Libbi Ethier

 Tags anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, eating disorders, mental health, Mental Health 

 

Awareness Month, programming, Schizophrenia, substance abuse, suicide prevention

Suicide Prevention Month: The Happiest I’ve Been

By Stacie Price

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This post is part of a Suicide Prevention Month blog series. Read the other blogs here. 

 

Please Note: The following post mentions childhood sexual abuse.

 

Washed-Out-Dont-Give-Up-608×354

 

From a very young age, I had to fend for myself and protect those who were around me, whether it was my little brother from my mother’s beatings or my cousin from my step-grandfather’s sexual abuse.

 

I was never looking out for me.

 

I never had anyone to turn to. In school I was bullied by so many people including people I called my friends. Even my teachers bullied me because in their minds I wasn’t “smart” enough.

 

I would go home and be abused whether it was sexually, physically or mentally. I would go through everything, and afterward I would pretend I was okay.

 

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 Date September 30, 2015

 Author Stacie Price

 Tags childhood abuse, depression, recovery, self-harm prevention, sexual assault, suicide prevention month

 

Suicide Prevention Month: Love Letters to Myself

By Anonymous

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This post is part of a Suicide Prevention Month blog series. Read the other blogs here.

 

love-letter-e1393478060868Walking back to my apartment one night, I passed by the fluorescent lighting of the local hospital. The combination of the sight of the emergency room and the sour, medicinal smell made me remember my suicide attempt in a way that was so visceral, I started shaking, feeling my lungs tighten around my ribcage and wondering when the tears would start.

 

I will spare the details of my attempt because for some time I hated anyone who knew what happened that night. I hated my friends for calling the EMTs. I hated my college’s crisis counselor for holding my hand in the ambulance. I hated the nurse who gave me crackers when I woke up the next morning in a hospital bed, embarrassed and terrified they would force me to leave school for the rest of the semester.

 

I wanted to hate myself, too, but they told me not to do that anymore.

 

I was able to leave the hospital the next morning and go back to school, but not without the pain of being abandoned by friends who believed I was too dramatic. This resulted in my habit of pretending nothing happened at all. The rest of the semester was shaky, filled with constant uncertainty and regular reminders that the word “survivor” now applied to my life.

 

But I slowly started to learn what it meant to be a person, to be alive. I began to journal. “Dear Self,” the first entry started. “You have been pissing me off a lot lately. No, really. I try to coddle you and make you feel comfortable, and you repay me in panic attacks, suicide attempts, and an inability to leave bed. This letter is your final written warning that I will not put up with your bullshit anymore.”

 

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 Date September 22, 2015

 Author Anonymous

 Tags depression, panic attacks, recovery, suicide attempt survivor, suicide prevention, suicide prevention month

 

Suicide Prevention Month: A Life Worth Living

By Anonymous

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This post is part of a Suicide Prevention Month blog series. Read the other blogs here.

 

you are not a burden active minds suicide prevention monthAccording to the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide (Van Orden et al., 2010), desires for suicide arise from a combination of perceived burdensomeness (i.e. “the world would be better off without me”) and thwarted belongingness (i.e. “no one will ever truly love or understand me”).

 

The capability for suicide is a separate, yet crucial factor that interacts with these desires. Where capability is present, there is the most acute, immediate, and serious risk for suicide. However, many people experience persistent desires for suicide without capability for it. That was the case for me for most of my life.

 

I’ve almost always felt like a burden –which makes sense considering that my father, frustrated that I didn’t have the attributes he had wanted in a child, frequently said I was a burden.

 

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 Date September 16, 2015

 Author Anonymous

 Tags depression, recovery, suicide prevention, suicide prevention month

 

Suicide Prevention Month: Reasons to Stay

By Alyse Ruriani

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This post is part of a Suicide Prevention Month blog series. Read the other blogs here.

 

IMG_1297I am alive.

 

Some days, this surprises me. I think of all that has happened in the 20.5 years of my life and am shocked to find myself still standing, still breathing, heart still beating. If you asked me a couple years ago if I would live to see 21, I would have laughed in your face. I would have said that my illnesses would probably take me before I even reached 18.

 

My illnesses are not physical; they are mental. That does not mean that they are any less serious, life-threatening, or difficult. It means that everyday I was fighting a battle against myself. I was at war with my own being and that was difficult on its own.

 

At age 17, after spending three years trying to balance my eating disorder, depression, borderline personality, anxiety, and self injury alongside of high school and being a “normal” teenager, I decided it was time to give up. I was tired of trying medication after medication. I was tired of going through so many different therapists. I was tired of fighting. I thought that it was never going to get better and that treatment was failing me. I felt hopeless. Continue Reading

 

 Date September 14, 2015

 Author Alyse Ruriani

 Tags anxiety, depression, eating disorders, recovery, suicide attempt survivor, suicide prevention, suicide prevention month

 

Mental Health News Round-Up: August 21

By Kathryn DeWitt

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Michael Sam Leaves Pro Football, Cites Mental Health Concerns

Openly gay football pioneer Michael Sam is taking a break pro football to take care of his mental health. This is an important step for athletes to break down stigma and realize the importance of taking care of both physical and mental health equally.

 

Gun Laws Associated With Lower Suicide Rates

Decreasing access to lethal means prevents suicide according to a study in the American Journal of Public Health. The four laws specifically investigated were waiting periods, background checks for purchase or licensing, hand gun locks, and restrictions on the open carrying.

 

If you are struggling, please reach out to the National Suicide Prevention LifeLine at 1-800-273-8255 or the Crisis Text Line by texting “Start” to 741-741.

 

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 Date August 21, 2015

 Author Kathryn DeWitt

 Tags athletes, depression, mental health, mental health news, suicide prevention

 

Mental Health News Round-Up: August 7

By Kathryn DeWitt

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Coffee Can Help Boost Your Mental Health

 

Moderate coffee drinkers were found to be less likely to develop mild cognitive imperative. Drink up coffee lovers!

 

Picky Eating in Children Linked to Anxiety, Depression and A.D.H.D.

New research in Pediatrics shows that extremely picky eating during childhood could be indicative of other behavioral health problems in the future. One scientist explains this connection because these youth are more sensitive to their environment and thus more easily affected by outside factors.

 

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 Date August 7, 2015

 Author Kathryn DeWitt

 Tags ADHD, depression, eating disorders, mental health, mental health news, Obsessive 

 

Compulsive Disorder, recovery

My Story: Recovering from Adolescent Bullying

By Dan R

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“Make a fist. Now I want you to punch the air!” yelled Dr. Lin.

 

“Was this what you do in therapy? What is the point of this?” I kept thinking. I sat there reluctantly, refusing to have a fake fight with the wind blowing from the ceiling fan. This was pointless, and I just wanted to leave.

 

“I don’t feel like it. I’m not angry, and I don’t need to be talking to you.” I cowered back.  This short, impatient man was not going to waste my time. I was in a state of too much denial and self loathing to accept that I needed help. I may not have been externally angry, but there was no question I was angry with myself.

 

Needless to say, my first therapy appointment was a total disaster. The reason my parents had forced me to talk to a psychologist was because I was deciding whether I was going to transfer high schools in the middle of ninth grade. Before making the investment to send me to private school 20 miles away, they wanted to make sure this was the right decision.

 

Upon reflection, it was really not that much of a surprise that I had been the target of so much bullying. As far as middle school went, I had failed in pretty much every way possible to be cool. I was overweight, unathletic (and worse didn’t even know things about sports), musically talented, an unbelievable push-over, and worst of all, Jewish. At my middle school in northern NJ being anything but white, athletic and Christian was more or less a death sentence on the middle school social totem-pole.

 

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 Date July 28, 2015

 Author Dan R

 Tags bullying, depression, mental health, recovery, therapy

 

Mental Health News Round Up: July 24

By Kathryn DeWitt

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White House Discusses Native American Mental Health With Youth Leaders

On July 9, the White House gathered 875 Native youth in the Tribal Youth Gathering to discuss and make change in key issues facing Native communities. One of the initiatives called the SAMHSA Tribal Youth Leaders focused on mental health and substance use.

 

Studies Show Your Financial Health Could Be A Good Indicator Of Your Mental Health

Researchers have noted a correlation between debt and mental health problems.  Forbes suggests combatting both at the same time by recognizing the link between the two, and seeking help for both mental health and finances.

 

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 Date July 24, 2015

 Author Kathryn DeWitt

 Tags depression, mental health news, Minority Mental Health Month, stigma

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