Can CBD help with skin care? What benefits do CBD skincare products provide?

  • A study published in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences has suggested the existence of a functional endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the skin and implicated it in various biological processes(1)
  • CBD impacts the TRPV-1 and GPR55 receptors(2). Both receptors are found in the skin and play a role in pain signaling and inflammation.
  • Research showed that CBD exerted complex anti-inflammatory actions, which indicated that CBD reduced excessive oil production, making it a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of acne vulgaris or common acne(3)
  • A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America concluded that CBD, as an antioxidant (anti-aging), was 30%- 50% more potent than both Vitamins C and E(4). CBD might also help reduce itch and skin dryness, as shown in a 2017 review published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology(5)
  • However, CBD may cause drug interactions or allergic reactions. Thus, consumers are advised to first consult with a dermatologist experienced in cannabis use before including CBD skincare products in their skincare regimen.

CBD Skin Benefits: What the Research Says

The numerous skin benefits of CBD make it a popular ingredient in many skincare products such as face masks, oils, creams, body lotion, balms, and serums.

What do scientists and experts say about CBD as an active component in CBD skin care products? How can CBD help the skin?

A study published in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences has suggested the existence of a functional endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the skin and implicated it in various biological processes(6).

In the said study, the authors noted that the primary physiological function of the ECS in the skin seemed to be the regulation of the well-balanced proliferation, survival, and tolerance of skin cells. 

They said that the disruption of this delicate balance might facilitate the development of multiple skin problems, such as acne, seborrhea (red, itchy rash and white scales), allergic dermatitis, psoriasis (painful, dry, raised, and red skin lesions), and cancer.

The ECS, which is a network of cannabinoids and receptors, regulates most functions in the human body. The ECS also gathers and interprets signals from cannabinoids.

In one study published in the Journal of Dermatological Science, researchers isolated THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids from cannabis(7).

The researchers found that, when applied to human skin cells, the cannabinoids inhibited the overproduction of keratinocytes (skin cells) commonly seen in psoriasis.

In addition to its effects on CB1 and CB2 receptors, there is evidence that CBD impacts the TRPV-1 and GPR55 receptors(8). Both receptors play a role in pain signaling and inflammation.

The significant purported benefits of CBD in skin care seem to be linked to its anti-inflammatory characteristics, as a 2017 study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology suggests(9).

A study examined cannabinoids, particularly CBD and THC, in the management of difficult to treat pain(5). The authors found that cannabinoid analgesics (pain-relievers) have generally been well-tolerated in clinical trials with acceptable adverse event profiles.

Research showed that CBD exerted complex anti-inflammatory actions, which indicated that CBD reduced excessive oil production, making it a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of acne vulgaris or common acne(11). 

A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America concluded that CBD, as an antioxidant (anti-aging), was 30%- 50% more potent than both Vitamins C and E(12).

CBD might also be useful in reducing itch and skin dryness, as shown in a 2017 review published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology(13)

Meanwhile, a study published in the journal Clinical Therapeutics in 2019 examined individuals with either psoriasis, eczema, or scarring(14).

The researchers found that CBD might help in hydrating and moisturizing the skin, enhancing skin elasticity.

How To Choose The Right CBD Products for Skin Care

The following factors are essential to ensure the safety and reliability of CBD skincare products purchased:

  1. Research on the exact legal stipulations applicable to CBD in the area where it would be bought and used.
  2. Purchase only high-quality CBD products from legitimate and reliable brands. 
  3. Research product reviews before buying from an online store. When purchasing from a physical store or dispensary, check whether the store is authorized by the government to sell CBD.
  4. Many brands selling CBD skin products list the total cannabidiol content in milligrams, sometimes further broken down per use. This piece of information is a good indicator the CBD product is legitimate. 
  5. Read product labels and know the ingredients to avoid any adverse reactions, such as allergies or skin irritation. 
  6. Look for the certification codes. Several certification authorities approve certain products only after some thorough screening tests. 
  7. Compare company claims about their products’ potency with that of the third-party lab reports. Look for the certificate of analysis (COA) of the purchased product.

Conclusion

Cannabidiol (CBD) is becoming increasingly popular in the skincare industry. With its purported skin benefits, it has now evolved into a new skincare trend. 

However, there is not enough conclusive research to validate the advantages of CBD skincare products over those that do not contain CBD. Also, other added ingredients, such as fragrance, dye, and preservatives, may bring about adverse reactions and allergies.

Thus, carefully read labels and follow manufacturer’s instructions when using CBD skincare products or CBD beauty products. 

More importantly, before using CBD skincare products to address specific skin disorders or symptoms, first consult with a dermatologist experienced in cannabis use for advice. 


  1. Bíró T, Tóth BI, Haskó G, Paus R, Pacher P. The endocannabinoid system of the skin in health and disease: novel perspectives and therapeutic opportunities. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2009;30(8):411–420. doi:10.1016/j.tips.2009.05.004.
  2. Sharir H, Abood ME. Pharmacological characterization of GPR55, a putative cannabinoid receptor. Pharmacol Ther. 2010;126(3):301–313. DOI:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2010.02.004; Costa B, Giagnoni G, Franke C, Trovato AE, Colleoni M. Vanilloid TRPV1 receptor mediates the antihyperalgesic effect of the nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol, in a rat model of acute inflammation. Br J Pharmacol. 2004;143(2):247–250. DOI:10.1038/sj.bjp.0705920.
  3. Oláh A, Tóth BI, Borbíró I, et al. Cannabidiol exerts sebostatic and antiinflammatory effects on human sebocytes. J Clin Invest. 2014;124(9):3713–3724. DOI:10.1172/JCI64628.
  4. Hampson AJ, Grimaldi M, Axelrod J, Wink D. Cannabidiol and (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are neuroprotective antioxidants. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998;95(14):8268–8273. DOI:10.1073/pnas.95.14.8268.
  5. Mounessa J et al. The role of cannabinoids in dermatology. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Volume 77, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages e87-e88.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.02.056.
  6. Bíró T, Tóth BI, Haskó G, Paus R, Pacher P. The endocannabinoid system of the skin in health and disease: novel perspectives and therapeutic opportunities. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2009;30(8):411–420. doi:10.1016/j.tips.2009.05.004.
  7. Wilkinson J, Williamson E.  Cannabinoids inhibit human keratinocyte proliferation through a non-CB1/CB2 mechanism and have a potential therapeutic value in the treatment of psoriasis. Journal of Dermatological Science Volume 45, Issue 2, February 2007, Pages 87-92. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdermsci.2006.10.009.
  8. Sharir H, Abood ME. Pharmacological characterization of GPR55, a putative cannabinoid receptor. Pharmacol Ther. 2010;126(3):301–313. DOI:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2010.02.004; Costa B, Giagnoni G, Franke C, Trovato AE, Colleoni M. Vanilloid TRPV1 receptor mediates the antihyperalgesic effect of the nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol, in a rat model of acute inflammation. Br J Pharmacol. 2004;143(2):247–250. DOI:10.1038/sj.bjp.0705920.
  9. Mounessa BS et al. The role of cannabinoids in dermatology. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. Volume 77, Issue 1, July 2017, Pages 188-190. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.02.056.
  10. Russo EB. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2008;4(1):245–259. doi:10.2147/tcrm.s1928.
  11. Oláh A, Tóth BI, Borbíró I, et al. Cannabidiol exerts sebostatic and antiinflammatory effects on human sebocytes. J Clin Invest. 2014;124(9):3713–3724. DOI:10.1172/JCI64628.
  12. Hampson AJ, Grimaldi M, Axelrod J, Wink D. Cannabidiol and (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are neuroprotective antioxidants. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998;95(14):8268–8273. DOI:10.1073/pnas.95.14.8268.
  13. Mounessa J et al. The role of cannabinoids in dermatology. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Volume 77, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages e87-e88.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.02.056.
  14. Palmieri B, Laurino C, Vadalà M. A therapeutic effect of cbd-enriched ointment in inflammatory skin diseases and cutaneous scars. Clin Ter. 2019 Mar-Apr;170(2):e93-e99. doi: 10.7417/CT.2019.2116. DOI: 10.7417/CT.2019.2116.

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The following information has been extracted from our CHEMINFO database, which also contains hazard control and regulatory information. [More about…] [Sample Record]

 

Access the complete CHEMINFO database by contacting CCOHS Client Services.

SECTION 1. CHEMICAL IDENTIFICATION

 

CHEMINFO Record Number: 453

CCOHS Chemical Name: Isobutyl acetate

Synonyms:

Acetic acid, isobutyl ester

Acetic acid, 2-methylpropyl ester

2-Methyl-1-propyl acetate

2-Methylpropyl acetate

beta-Methylpropyl ethanoate

Butyl acetate (non-specific name)

2-Methylpropyl ethanoate

Chemical Name French: Acétate d’isobutyle

Chemical Name Spanish: Acetato de isobutilo

CAS Registry Number: 110-19-0

UN/NA Number(s): 1213

RTECS Number(s): AI4025000

EU EINECS/ELINCS Number: 203-745-1

Chemical Family: Aliphatic carboxylic acid ester / saturated aliphatic carboxylic acid ester / saturated aliphatic monocarboxylic acid ester / alkyl alkanoate / acetic acid ester / acetate / butyl ester

Molecular Formula: C6-H12-O2

Structural Formula: (CH3)2-CH-CH2-O-C(=O)-CH3

 

SECTION 2. DESCRIPTION

 

Appearance and Odour:

Colourless liquid with a mild, sweet, fruity or floral odour; may be disagreeable in higher concentrations.(2,6)

Odour Threshold:

Reported values vary widely; 0.36-3.6 ppm (geometric mean: 1.1 ppm) (detection); 0.51-7.2 ppm (geometric mean: 1.9 ppm) (recognition) (11)

Warning Properties:

GOOD – TLV is more than 20 times the odour threshold

Composition/Purity:

May contain small amounts of water and isobutyl alcohol.(6)

Uses and Occurrences:

Used as a solvent for nitrocellulose, varnishes, thinners, sealants, and topcoat lacquers; flavouring agent; perfume ingredient; in manufacture of pharmaceuticals.(2,6,7) Occurs naturally in fruits, such as raspberries, pears and pineapples, and in natural cocoa aroma.(1)

 

SECTION 3. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION

 

EMERGENCY OVERVIEW:

Colourless liquid with a mild, sweet, fruity or floral odour; may be disagreeable in higher concentrations. FLAMMABLE LIQUID AND VAPOUR. Vapour is heavier than air and may spread long distances. Distant ignition and flashback are possible. Liquid may float on water and travel to distant locations and/or spread fire. May be irritating to respiratory tract. Mild central nervous system depressant. High vapour concentrations may cause headache, nausea, dizziness, incoordination, confusion and unconsciousness.

 

POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS

 

Effects of Short-Term (Acute) Exposure

 

Inhalation:

The vapour may be irritating to the nose and throat. Exposures to high concentrations may cause signs of central nervous system (CNS) depression including headache, dizziness, nausea and unconsciousness. No human information is available for isobutyl acetate, but effects are expected to be similar to those observed in humans following exposure to n-butyl acetate (CHEMINFO record 439).

Skin Contact:

The liquid is probably a mild to moderate irritant, based on animal information. There is no human information available.

Eye Contact:

The vapour and liquid are probably mildly irritating, based on animal information and comparison to n-butyl acetate. There is no human information available.

Ingestion:

Animal toxicity information indicates that isobutyl acetate is not very toxic by ingestion. There is no human information available. Isobutyl acetate may be irritating to the mouth and throat. Ingestion of large amounts may produce signs of CNS depression, as described in “Inhalation”. Ingestion is not a typical route of occupational exposure.

Effects of Long-Term (Chronic) Exposure

 

SKIN CONTACT: Repeated or prolonged skin contact may cause irritation and drying. Skin sensitization was not observed in 28 volunteers exposed to 2% isobutyl acetate in petrolatum.(1)

 

No effects from long-term exposure have been reported in the literature.

Carcinogenicity:

There is no human or animal information available. Isobutyl acetate is probably not carcinogenic.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has not evaluated the carcinogenicity of this chemical.

The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) has not assigned a carcinogenicity designation to this chemical.

The US National Toxicology Program (NTP) has not listed this chemical in its report on carcinogens.

Teratogenicity and Embryotoxicity:

There is no human or animal information available.

Reproductive Toxicity:

There is no human or animal information available.

Mutagenicity:

There is no information available.

Toxicologically Synergistic Materials:

There is no information available.

Potential for Accumulation:

Probably does not accumulate. Animal studies suggest that isobutyl acetate is rapidly broken down in the body to acetic acid and isobutanol and eliminated in the urine.(2)

 

SECTION 4. FIRST AID MEASURES

 

Inhalation:

This chemical is flammable. Take proper precautions (e.g. remove any sources of ignition). Remove source of contamination or move victim to fresh air. Obtain medical attention immediately.

Skin Contact:

Quickly and gently blot or brush away excess chemical. Wash gently and thoroughly with water and non-abrasive soap for 5 minutes or until the chemical is removed. Under running water, remove contaminated clothing, shoes, and leather goods (e.g., watchbands, belts). If irritation persists, obtain medical attention immediately. Completely decontaminate clothing, shoes and leather goods before re-use or discard.

Eye Contact:

Immediately flush the contaminated eye(s) with lukewarm, gently flowing water for 5 minutes, or until the chemical is removed, while holding the eyelid(s) open. If irritation persists, repeat flushing. Obtain medical attention immediately.

Ingestion:

NEVER give anything by mouth if victim is rapidly losing consciousness, or is unconscious or convulsing. Have victim rinse mouth thoroughly with water. DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING. Have victim drink 240 to 300 mL (8 to 10 oz.) of water. Obtain medical attention immediately.

First Aid Comments:

Provide general supportive measures (comfort, warmth, rest).

Consult a doctor and/or the nearest Poison Control Centre for all exposures except minor instances of inhalation or skin contact.

All first aid procedures should be periodically reviewed by a doctor familiar with the material and its conditions of use in the workplace.

 

SECTION 5. FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES

 

Flash Point:

18 deg C (64 deg F) (closed cup) (6,7); 21 deg C (70 deg F) (closed cup) (6,9)

Lower Flammable (Explosive) Limit (LFL/LEL):

1.3% (6); 2.4% (6)

Upper Flammable (Explosive) Limit (UFL/UEL):

7.5% (6); 10.5% (6)

Autoignition (Ignition) Temperature:

421 deg C (790 deg F) (8)

Sensitivity to Mechanical Impact:

Not sensitive. Stable material.

Sensitivity to Static Charge:

Probably will not accumulate static charge, since it has a high electrical conductivity (2.5 x 10(10) pS/m).(10). Vapours in the flammable range may be ignited by a static discharge of sufficient energy.

Fire Hazard Summary:

Flammable liquid. Can form vapours that form explosive mixtures with air at, or above, 18 deg C. Vapour is heavier than air and may travel a considerable distance to a source of ignition and flash back to a leak or open container. Liquid may float on water and travel to distant locations and/or spread fire. Can accumulate in confined spaces, resulting in a toxicity and flammability hazard. Closed containers may rupture violently when heated.

Extinguishing Media:

Carbon dioxide, dry chemical powder, “alcohol” foam or polymer foam. Water may be ineffective because it will not cool isobutyl acetate below its flash point. Fire fighting foams are the extinguishing agent of choice for most flammable liquid fires.(6,9)

 

Fire Fighting Instructions:

Evacuate area and fight fire from a safe distance or protected location. Approach fire from upwind to avoid hazardous vapours and toxic decomposition products.

Stop leak before attempting to stop the fire. If the leak cannot be stopped, and if there is no risk to the surrounding area, let the fire burn itself out. If the flames are extinguished without stopping the leak, vapours could form explosive mixtures with air and reignite.

Water can extinguish the fire if used under favourable conditions and when hose streams are applied by experienced firefighters trained in fighting all types of flammable liquid fires. Isolate materials not yet involved in the fire and protect personnel. Move containers from fire area if this can be done without risk. Otherwise, fire-exposed containers or tanks should be cooled by application of hose streams and this should begin as soon as possible (within the first several minutes) and should concentrate on any unwetted portions of the container. If this is not possible, use unmanned monitor nozzles and immediately evacuate the area.

If a leak or spill has not ignited, use water spray in large quantities to disperse the vapours, to protect personnel attempting to stop a leak and to. Water spray can be used to dilute spills to nonflammable mixtures and to flush spills away from ignition sources. Solid streams of water may be ineffective and spread material. For a massive fire in a large area, use unmanned hose holder or monitor nozzles; if this is not possible withdraw from fire area and allow fire to burn. Stay away from ends of tanks. Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from venting safety device or any discolouration of tank due to fire.

Firefighters may enter the area if positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus (MSHA/NIOSH approved or equivalent) and full Bunker Gear is worn.

 

NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION (NFPA) HAZARD IDENTIFICATION

 

NFPA – Health: 1 – Exposure would cause significant irritation, but only minor residual injury.

NFPA – Flammability: 3 – Liquids and solids that can be ignited under almost all ambient temperature conditions.

NFPA – Instability: 0 – Normally stable, even under fire conditions, and not reactive with water.

 

SECTION 9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

 

Molecular Weight: 116.16

Conversion Factor:

1 ppm = 4.74 mg/m3; 1 mg/m3 = 0.211 ppm at 25 deg C at 25 deg C (calculated)

Physical State: Liquid

Melting Point: -98.9 to -98.6 deg C (-146 to -145.5 deg F) (6)

Boiling Point: 117.2 deg C (243 deg F) (7)

Relative Density (Specific Gravity): 0.871 at 20 deg C (water = 1) (2,7,12)

Solubility in Water: Slightly soluble (0.63-0.7 g/100 g at 20 deg C) (6)

Solubility in Other Liquids: Soluble in all proportions in most organic solvents, such as ethanol, diethyl ether, ketones, other esters.(12)

Coefficient of Oil/Water Distribution (Partition Coefficient): Log P(oct) = 1.60 (2)

pH Value: Neutral.(2)

Vapour Density: 4.0 (air = 1) (5,12)

Vapour Pressure: 1.67-1.73 kPa (12.5-13 mm Hg) at 20 deg C (6,12,13)

Saturation Vapour Concentration: 16450 ppm (1.65%) at 20 deg C (calculated)

Evaporation Rate: 1.5 (n-butyl acetate = 1) (2)

Critical Temperature: 296 deg C (565 deg F) (2)

Other Physical Properties:

SURFACE TENSION: 23.7 mN/m (23.7 dynes/cm) at 20 deg C (2)

CRITICAL PRESSURE: 3242.7 kPa (32 atm) (2)

 

SECTION 10. STABILITY AND REACTIVITY

 

Stability:

Stable in the anhydrous state. Decomposes slowly when exposed to light or on contact with water forming acetic acid and isobutanol.(10) Heat can cause instability.(6)

Hazardous Polymerization:

Does not occur

Incompatibility – Materials to Avoid:

NOTE: Chemical reactions that could result in a hazardous situation (e.g. generation of flammable or toxic chemicals, fire or detonation) are listed here. Many of these reactions can be done safely if specific control measures (e.g. cooling of the reaction) are in place. Although not intended to be complete, an overview of important reactions involving common chemicals is provided to assist in the development of safe work practices.

 

OXIDIZING AGENTS (e.g. nitrates, perchlorates, peroxides) – reaction can be violent. Increased risk of fire and explosion.(10,12)

STRONG ACIDS (e.g. sulfuric acid, oleum, and chlorosulfonic acid) or STRONG BASES (e.g. potassium hydroxide) – decomposition (hydrolysis) can occur, releasing heat. The reaction may be vigorous and there is a risk of fire and explosion.(6,12,13)

POTASSIUM TERT-BUTOXIDE – contact with isobutyl acetate vapour may cause ignition.

EXPLOSIVES – contact may cause an explosion.(6)

Hazardous Decomposition Products:

Acetic acid, isobutanol

Conditions to Avoid:

Open flames, sparks, electrostatic discharge, heat and other ignition sources, moisture.

Corrosivity to Metals:

Not corrosive to iron, steel, stainless steel, aluminum, copper and nickel and their alloys.(14)

Stability and Reactivity Comments:

Can attack many plastics and resins.(6,7)

 

SECTION 11. TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

 

LC50 (rat): approximately 8000 ppm (4-hour exposure); 4 out of 6 rats died (3)

LD50 (oral, rat): 13400 mg/kg (cited as 15.4 mL/kg) (1)

LD50 (oral, rabbit): 4800 mg/kg (cited as 41 mmol/kg) (4)

LD50 (dermal, rabbit): Greater than 5000 mg/kg (1, unconfirmed)

Eye Irritation:

Application of 0.005 mL of undiluted isobutyl acetate produced mild irritation in rabbits.(3)

Skin Irritation:

Application of 0.01 mL of undiluted isobutyl acetate caused no irritation in rabbits after 24 hours.(3) An unconfirmed study found that application of undiluted isobutyl acetate to intact or abraded skin, under cover, produced moderate irritation in rabbits.(1)

Effects of Short-Term (Acute) Exposure:

Inhalation:

Rats exposed to 3000 ppm for 6 hours experienced no adverse effects. All 6 rats exposed to 21000 ppm became unconscious and died within 150 minutes.(5) In another study, inhalation of 16000 ppm killed 6/6 rats.(3)

 

SECTION 16. OTHER INFORMATION

 

Selected Bibliography:

(1) Opdyke, D.L.J. Monographs on fragrance raw materials: isobutyl acetate. Food and Cosmetics Toxicology. Vol 16 (suppl. 1) (Dec. 1978). p. 795-796

(2) HSDB record for isobutyl acetate. Last revision date: 95/01/23

(3) Smyth, Jr., H.F., et al. Range-finding toxicity data: list VI. Industrial Hygiene Journal. Vol. 23 (Mar.-Apr. 1962). p. 95-107

(4) Munch, J.C. Aliphatic alcohols and alkyl esters: narcotic and lethal potencies to tadpoles and to rabbits. Industrial Medicine. Vol. 41, no. 4 (Apr. 1972). p. 31-33

(5) Bisesi, M.S. Esters. In : Patty’s Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology. 4th edition. Volume II. Toxicology. Part D. John Wiley and Sons, 1994. p. 2967-2971, 2978-2985

(6) Emergency action guide for isobutyl acetate. Association of American Railroads, Jan. 1988

(7) Tau, K.D., et al. Esters, organic. In: Kirk-Othmer encyclopedia of chemical technology. 4th ed. Vol. 9. John Wiley and Sons, 1994. p. 781-812

(8) Fire protection guide to hazardous materials. 13th ed. Edited by A.B. Spencer, et al. National Fire Protection Association, 2002. NFPA 325

(9) The Sigma-Aldrich library of chemical safety data. Ed. II. Vol. 1. Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, 1988. p. 2017C

(10) Chemical safety sheets: working safely with hazardous chemicals. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1991. p. 500

(11) Odor thresholds for chemicals with established occupational health standards. American Industrial Hygiene Association, 1989. p. 21, 63

(12) Isobutyl acetate. In: Documentation of the threshold limit values and biological exposure indices. 6th ed. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, 1991. p. 814

(13) NIOSH pocket guide to chemical hazards. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, June 1994. p. 176-177

(14) Corrosion data survey: metals section. 6th edition. National Association of Corrosion Engineers, 1985. p. 72-73

(15) European Communities. Commission Directive 98/98/EC. Dec. 15, 1998

(16) Forsberg, K., et al. Quick selection guide to chemical protective clothing. 4th ed. Van Nostrand Reinhold, 2002

(17) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Organic Vapors. In: OSHA Analytical Methods Manual. Revision Date: Oct. 31, 2001. Available at: <www.osha-slc.gov/dts/sltc/methods/toc.html>

(18) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Esters I. In: NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods (NMAM(R)). 4th ed. Edited by M.E. Cassinelli, et al. DHHS (NIOSH) Publication 94-113. Aug. 1994. Available at: <www.cdc.gov/niosh/nmam/nmammenu.html>

Information on chemicals reviewed in the CHEMINFO database is drawn from a number of publicly available sources. A list of general references used to compile CHEMINFO records is available in the database Help.

 

Review/Preparation Date: 1996-07-24

 

Revision Indicators:

US transport 1998-03-01

Resistance of materials 1998-04-01

Bibliography 2000-04-01

EU Class 2000-04-01

EU Risk 2000-04-01

EU Safety 2000-04-01

TDG 2002-05-29

PEL-TWA final 2003-12-04

Resistance of materials for PPE 2004-04-04

Bibliography 2004-04-04

Bibliography 2005-03-07

Passive Sampling Devices 2005-03-07

Sampling/analysis 2005-03-07

Sampling/analysis 2005-03-14

Synonyms 2006-01-30

 

———————–

 

2-DIMETHYLAMINOETHANOLICSC: 0654
Date of Peer Review: October 2005

Dimethylethanolamine

N,N-Dimethyl-2-hydroxyethylamine

CAS #108-01-0C4H11NO / (CH3)2NCH2CH2OH
RTECS #KK6125000Molecular mass: 89.1
UN #2051
EC Index #603-047-00-0

 

TYPES OF HAZARD / EXPOSUREACUTE HAZARDS / SYMPTOMSPREVENTIONFIRST AID / FIRE FIGHTING
FIREFlammable. Gives off irritating or toxic fumes (or gases) in a fire.NO open flames, NO sparks, and NO smoking.Water spray. Alcohol-resistant foam. Powder, carbon dioxide.
EXPLOSIONAbove 38°C explosive vapour/air mixtures may be formed.Above 38°C use a closed system, ventilation, and explosion-proof electrical equipment.In case of fire: keep drums, etc., cool by spraying with water.

 

EXPOSUREAVOID ALL CONTACT!
InhalationCough. Sore throat. Burning sensation. Laboured breathing. Symptoms may be delayed (see Notes).Ventilation, local exhaust, or breathing protection.Fresh air, rest. Half-upright position. Refer for medical attention.
SkinRedness. Pain. Skin burns.Protective gloves. Protective clothing.First rinse with plenty of water, then remove contaminated clothes and rinse again. Refer for medical attention.
EyesRedness. Pain. Severe deep burns.Safety goggles or eye protection in combination with breathing protection.First rinse with plenty of water for several minutes (remove contact lenses if easily possible), then take to a doctor.
IngestionAbdominal pain. Nausea. Vomiting. Shock or collapse. Burning sensation.Do not eat, drink, or smoke during work.Rinse mouth. Do NOT induce vomiting. Give plenty of water to drink. Rest. Refer for medical attention.

 

SPILLAGE DISPOSALPACKAGING & LABELLING
Personal protection: gas-tight chemical protection suit including self-contained breathing apparatus. Collect leaking liquid in sealable non-metallic containers. Absorb remaining liquid in sand or inert absorbent and remove to safe place.EU Classification

Symbol: C

R: 10-20/21/22-34

S: (1/2-)-25-26-36/37/39-45

UN Classification

UN Hazard Class: 8

UN Subsidiary Risks: 3

UN Pack Group: II

EMERGENCY RESPONSESTORAGE
Transport Emergency Card: TEC (R)-80GCF1-II

NFPA Code: H2; F2; R0

Fireproof. Separated from strong oxidants, acids, acid chlorides, copper, food and feedstuffs.
IPCS

International

Programme on

Chemical Safety

Prepared in the context of cooperation between the International Programme on Chemical Safety and the Commission of the European Communities © IPCS, CEC 2005

SEE IMPORTANT INFORMATION ON BACK

 

2-DIMETHYLAMINOETHANOLICSC: 0654

 

IMPORTANT DATA
PHYSICAL STATE; APPEARANCE:

COLOURLESS LIQUID, WITH PUNGENT ODOUR.

PHYSICAL DANGERS:

The vapour is heavier than air.

CHEMICAL DANGERS:

The substance decomposes on burning producing toxic gases, including nitrogen oxides. The substance is a medium strong base. Reacts violently with acids, acid chlorides, oxidants and isocyanates, causing fire and explosion hazard. Attacks copper and its alloys.

OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE LIMITS:

TLV not established. MAK not established.

ROUTES OF EXPOSURE:

The substance can be absorbed into the body by inhalation of its vapour, through the skin and by ingestion.

INHALATION RISK:

No indication can be given about the rate in which a harmful concentration in the air is reached on evaporation of this substance at 20°C.

EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM EXPOSURE:

The substance is severely irritating to the respiratory tract. The substance is corrosive to the eyes and the skin. Corrosive on ingestion. Inhalation of the vapour may cause lung oedema (see Notes). The effects may be delayed. Medical observation is indicated.

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
Boiling point: 135°C

Melting point: -59°C

Relative density (water = 1): 0.89

Solubility in water: miscible

Vapour pressure, Pa at 20°C: 612

Relative vapour density (air = 1): 3.03

Flash point: 38°C c.c.

Auto-ignition temperature: 220°C

Explosive limits, vol% in air: 1.6-11.9

Octanol/water partition coefficient as log Pow: -0.55

ENVIRONMENTAL DATA
NOTES
The symptoms of lung oedema often do not become manifest until a few hours have passed and they are aggravated by physical effort. Rest and medical observation is therefore essential. Immediate administration of an appropriate inhalation therapy by a doctor or a person authorized by him/her, should be considered. Kalpur-p, Deanol and Liparon are trade names.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
LEGAL NOTICENeither the CEC nor the IPCS nor any person acting on behalf of the CEC or the IPCS is responsible for the use which might be made of this information
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